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Discovering Connected Devices in Linux: A Beginner's Guide
By TFH profile image TFH
2 min read

Discovering Connected Devices in Linux: A Beginner's Guide

Linux is renowned for its robustness and flexibility, especially when it comes to managing and monitoring hardware devices. Whether you're a seasoned system administrator or a curious newcomer, understanding how to interact with connected devices through the terminal can greatly enhance your Linux experience. This blog post introduces

Linux is renowned for its robustness and flexibility, especially when it comes to managing and monitoring hardware devices. Whether you're a seasoned system administrator or a curious newcomer, understanding how to interact with connected devices through the terminal can greatly enhance your Linux experience. This blog post introduces you to a broad range of commands and utilities that allow you to list and gather information about devices connected to your Linux system, including those not installed by default.

Preinstalled Utilities

Most Linux distributions come with a set of utilities that can be used out-of-the-box to discover and monitor hardware devices.

The lsusb Command
What It Does: Lists USB devices.
Usage: lsusb

The lspci Command
What It Does: Lists PCI devices.
Usage: lspci

The lsblk Command
What It Does: Lists block devices.
Usage: lsblk

The dmesg Command
What It Does: Displays kernel-related messages.
Usage: dmesg or dmesg | grep usb for USB devices.

The udevadm Command
What It Does: Queries the udev device manager.
Usage: udevadm info -a -n /dev/sda

Additional Utilities (May Require Installation)

Some highly useful commands might not be present on your system by default but can be easily installed using your distribution's package manager.

The hwinfo Command
What It Does: Shows detailed hardware information.
Installation (on Debian/Ubuntu): sudo apt install hwinfo
Usage: hwinfo or hwinfo --short for a brief overview.

The inxi Command
What It Does: Provides a comprehensive system overview.
Installation (on Debian/Ubuntu): sudo apt install inxi
Usage: inxi -F

The lshw Command
What It Does: Lists hardware configuration.
Installation (on Debian/Ubuntu): sudo apt install lshw
Usage: sudo lshw or sudo lshw -C network for network devices.

The lsmod Command
What It Does: Shows the status of modules in the Linux Kernel.
Usage: lsmod

Conclusion

Understanding and utilizing these commands can significantly enhance your ability to manage and troubleshoot hardware devices on your Linux system. While the preinstalled utilities offer great value, installing additional tools like hwinfo, inxi, and lshw can provide you with a deeper insight into your system's hardware.


The power of Linux lies in its flexibility and control. The terminal opens up a world of possibilities for managing your system, and these commands represent just the beginning of what you can explore. As you become more familiar with these tools, you'll find yourself better equipped to understand and resolve device-related issues, optimize performance, and customize your setup to your liking. Happy exploring!

By TFH profile image TFH
Updated on
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